Hummel Themes – Lamps

     I was curious as to what figurines were incorporated into table lamps and had no idea there were so many. I was able to locate 21 so far that are explained following. This list begins with the lower number HUMs and increases as you scroll down. This also, in some ways, is an historical chronology of the lamps as they were created one after another. There are many references you can access online and some are listed at the bottom of this page. Enjoy.

Hummels as Table Lamps

     There are a great number of variations within the lamps and some industrious collectors have even created their own versions using individual figurines and attaching them to a separate lamp. With this in mind, beware of what might be a copy and what is actually an original. Shown above is a grouping of five different examples in comparison illustrating the difference in height of each. Also, with some of the older trademarks, the original lamp shade has not fared as well as the ceramic figurines themselves over the past few decades, nor has the wiring which has made some vast improvements since the first examples were created.

HUM 44 A – Culprits
     Height – 8½ to 9½ inches
     This lamp utilizes figurine Culprits HUM 56/A and was a natural choice for a lamp due to the tree. Originally modeled by master sculptor Arthur Möeller in 1935. Older models have a half-inch larger base and a hole for an electrical switch on the top of the base. They usually have a 1935 copyright date incised. Culprits HUM 47 A was “temporarily withdrawn” (TW) from production on 31 December 1989. Numerous names have been employed since Culprits was first copyrighted in 1935 and issued a short time thereafter. Some of these are “Out on a Limb,” which was used in the U.S. copyrights GP1820 and GP1821 on October 6, 1950, “Boy in Tree” (1950 catalog), and Apfeldieb Junge for “Applethief Boy.” This is the first number to be divided into a related pair (44 A and 44 B), and it is also noteworthy because it was the first lamp design and the lamp preceded the design of the figurine, 56/A. Recently, Culprits has been found incised with 44 only. This example is valued at 50 percent more than one incised 44 A. Speculation indicates that this lamp/figurine was issued prior to 44 B Out of Danger. This is further supported by the 1935 copyright on 44 A and the 1936 date on 44 B. The original drawings have been reproduced in lithographs by Verlag Emil Fink in Stuttgart as postcard #223. The original M.I. Hummel drawing is owned by Fink. Both the height and design of the lamps changed over the years.

HUM 44 B – Out of Danger
     Height – 8½ to 9½ inches
     The figurine utilized as this lamp base is very similar to HUM 56/B. Originally modeled by master sculptor Arthur Möeller in 1935. Older models have a half-inch larger base and a hole for an electrical switch on the top of the base. They usually have a 1936 copyright date incised. There have been found variations in the color of the girl’s dress. Old Crown TMK-1 trademark examples are found with a girl in a black dress while the normal blue dress is found on all others. Out of Danger table lamp was “temporarily withdrawn” (TW) from production on 31 December 1989. The remarks about the other half of this pair apply except for the names which, in addition to “Out of Danger,” were “Out on a Limb,” “Girl in a Tree,” and the German In Sicherheit, Madchen for “Girl in Safety.” This design carries an incised 1936 copyright date, a year later than 44 A. It seems likely that Sister Hummel made two similar originals of Culprits and Out of Danger as she did of other boys and girls such as Apple Tree Boy and Apple Tree Girl and Umbrella Boy and Umbrella Girl. However, research failed to locate any drawing that resembles a girl having been chased up a tree by a dog that was close enough to have grabbed one shoe.

HUM 100 – Shrine
     Height – 7½ inches
     This extremely rare 7½ inch lamp base is similar to the figurine HUM 23, Adoration. As far as can be determined, only three or four exist in collectors’ hands presently. The lamps found, so far, bear the Crown or the Full Bee trademarks and are too unique to price. There are two versions of the lamp post as shown here. The more commonly found is the tree trunk post. The rarest is the fluted post. This example has a light beige colored post, an incised Crown TMK-1 trademark and is stamped “US Zone”. Another example has a dark brown post, an incised Crown TMK-1 trademark plus stamped with the Full Bee TMK-2 trademark along with a 6/50 date. It was modeled by Erich Lautensack in 1938 and produced in very limited quantities. This may also be found with the markings of HUM 2/100.

HUM 101 – To Market
     Height – 7½ inches
     Here is a good example of two of the variations within a model number, in this illustration, HUM 101, To Market. Originally modeled by master sculptor Arthur Möeller in 1937 but then listed as a closed edition on factory records 20 April 1937. It was redesigned and limited quantity was produced in the early 1950s with a “tree trunk” post. Some were incised with number II/101, III/101 and others with 101 only. The lamp was adapted from figurine HUM 49 To Market. On the left is an early prototype model of the To Market lamp base with the rare plain post. It was redesigned in the early 1950’s with the “tree trunk” post as shown to the right with the incised number 101. The majority are found with the tree trunk stem. These are valued at about $600-$900. The rarer of these is the plain fluted stem and is valued at around $5,000. So far, there have been only eleven of these known to be in collector’s hands. All eleven have either the Stylized or Full Bee trademarks. Master sculptor Arthur Möeller redesigned this lamp again in 1952 into the 9½ inch size with the incised number 223. This design, shown on the right, is still being produced.

HUM 102 – Volunteers
     Height – 7½ inches
     Closed Edition (CE)
     Oringinally modeled by master sculptor Erich Lautensack in 1937, this example of a rare lamp exists today in the collection of Robert Miller. HUM 102 was discontinued according to factory records on 20 April 1937 as were Hummel lamps 101 and 103. Until recently, no known examples existed, not even a factory sample, however, the Goebel factory now has one in their archives. According to Mr. Miller, the lamp was purchased by a dealer in 1979 for $14 at a thrift shop in Seattle, Washington. After verification of the lamp markings, Mr. Miller purchased this rare piece valued in the mid four-digit range. The lamp is marked with an incised number 102, a Double Crown incised and stamped mark, a black stamped Germany, and an artist’s mark. The underside of the base is doughnut-shaped; the lamp standard is white porcelain with a brass receptacle. HUM 50, the figurine Volunteers, is quite similar in design to the figurine on lamp 102. An example of an extremely rare lamp base is shown here and were produced in very limited quantities. The few found so far all bear the Crown trademark and have a plain white post. They are valued at around $8,000 to $10,000.

HUM 103 – Farewell
     Height – 7½ inches
     Closed Edition (CE)
     Originally modeled by Erich Lautensack in 1937. The factory records show this lamp as being a Closed Edition at the same time as the two before on 20 April 1937. Several examples of this extremely rare lamp have recently been found adn one ins now in the Robert L. Miller collection. A second lamp was presented to the Goebel factor for their archives in Rödental, Germany. Since 1983, several other specimens have been found, but is still considered extremely rare. The hunt for this rare lamp has been in progress for a long time. This example of an extremely rare lamp base with only five or six items currently known to exist in collector’s hands. If sold, it would probably bring upwards of $15,000.

HUM 104 – Wayside Devotion
     Height – 7½ inches
     Closed Edition (CE)
     This is the fourth lamp in a row that is listed as a Closed Edition by the Goebel factory. Originally modeled by Reinhold Unger in 1938, this lamp is listed as a closed edition on factory records 3 March 1938. This lamp was originally called “Wayside Devotion” in earlier books but is now correctly named “Eventide.” Presumably, the post for the shrine in HUM 28 was replaced by a circular column as in HUM 100, or a column resembling a tree trunk as used in current models. The change in design is not too significant, but the change in value between the figurine Wayside Devotion, HUM 28 and its counterpart as a lamp, HUM 104 is from four to ten times greater than the price for the comparable figurine. The lamp pictured here is the only known example of HUM 104 Eventide table lamp that was purchased from its original owner in northern Indiana and is now part of the Robert L. Miller Collection. The lamp was located through the help fo Ralph and Terry Kovel and their syndicated newspaper column on antiques. Notice the position of the lambs directly in front of the children. Compare the position of the lambs with that of the Figurines HUM 99 Eventide. If sold, it could bring somewhere in the neighborhood of $15,000.

HUM II/111 – Wayside Harmony
     Height – 7½ inches
     This lamp was made for a short period of time in the 1950’s. Perhaps to avoid confusion and/or to conform with the mold numbering system, the lamp was slightly redesigned and assigned a new number, HUM 224. The Roman prefix II designates this as a table lamp created from figure 111. There are only minor differences in sizes. This lamp was superseded at a later date by 224/I as the 7½ inch size, and 224/II as the 9½ inch size. The II/111 lamp is considered rare with a value in the high hundreds. To date, it has only been reported with the Crown (TMK-1) and the Full Bee (TMK-2) models. Whatever, the reason, there are a few of these II/111 Wayside Harmony lamps around. They occur in the Crown, Full Bee and the Stylized Bee trademarks. Quite scarce, they are valued at between $1,000 and $1,500 when found.

HUM II/112 – Just Resting
     Height – 7½ inches
     This lamp was made for a short period of time in the 1950’s. Perhaps to avoid confusion and/or to conform with the mold numbering system, the lamp was slightly redesigned and assigned a new number, HUM 225. Whatever, the reason, there are a few of these II/112 Just Resting lamps around. They occur in the Crown, Full Bee and the Stylized Bee trademarks. Quite scarce, they are valued at between $1,000 and $1500 when found. This 7 ½ inch table lamp was superseded by 225/I and 225/II for the 9 ½ inch size. It carries a 1938 copyright incised on the bottom and to date has only been reported with the Full Bee, TMK-2 trademark. It must have been made in very limited quantities in the very late Forties or early Fifties, as there are no known examples with a Crown TMK-1 mark. It is very rare and is hard to distinguish from 225/I except for minor details such as the smoother bark on the tree of the early one, and of course, the information on the base. It has been found about 8 inches high with the incised model number of 2/112/I.

HUM 202 – Old Man Reading Newspaper
     Height – 8¼ inches
     Master sculptor Arthur Möeller was apparently fascinated with this design and decided it should also be made as a table lamp. Approval for production was not authorized. Only four examples of this piece are known to exist being part of a five-piece set. Robert L. Miller has one of these sets, a set is in the Goebel company archives in Rödental, West Germany and two others are in private collections. There is little doubt that some others may exist, either singly or in a set but the number available is likely to be extremely small. They were made in samples only and apparently rejected by the Siessen Convent as atypical of Hummel art. These are considered to be too unique to place a price on. This was the only image I was able to locate of this certain figurine.

HUM 223 – To Market
     Height – 9½ inches
      Master sculptor Arthur Möeller redesigned this lamp in 1952 into the 9½ inch size with the incised number 223. This design is still being produced beginning with the Full Bee TMK-2 trademark. The lamp is based on the figurine To Market HUM 49 and is closely related to two other lamps, HUM 101 and HUM II/101. The principal difference between this lamp and the other two lamps is the size. HUM 223 is 9½ inches high as compared to the other two being two inches shorter at 7½ inches. This lamp also as a blossom on the tree trunk which II/101 does not have. The German name, Brüderlein and Schwesterlein, means “Brother and Sister,” which these two figurines are called when they are listed separately as HUM 95 and HUM 98.

HUM 224 – Wayside Harmony
     HUM 224/I Height – 7½ inches
     HUM 224/II Height – 9½ inches
     This adaptation of the figurine HUM 111 Wayside Harmony with the same name was apparently first incised with only the number 224 being 9½ inches high. The 9½ inch size was perhaps an alternative to HUM II/111, the same lamp in the 7½ inch size. In the 1950’s, HUM 224/I replaced the smaller 7½ inch lamp. Concurrently, the markings on the 9½ inch lamp were changed to 224/II. HUM 224/II has been intermittently available in the U.S. market but was not cataloged by distributors until it was reintroduced in 1978. This is in current production beginning with TMK-2.

HUM 225 – Just Resting
     HUM 225/I Height – 7½ inches
     HUM 225/II Height – 9½ inches
     This lamp was modeled by master sculptor Reinhold Unger in 1952 and is actually a restyling of HUM II/112 Just Resting lamp made in 1938. This lamp base utilizes HUM 112 as part of the design with two different sizes. The HUM 225/I lamp stands 7½ inches and began from TMK-2. The HUM 225/II was another option for a taller lamp and reflected a 2 inch increase to 9½ inches. An ideal companion piece to HUM 224 Wayside Harmony lamp, and over the years has had much the same history of size, number, and size indicator changes. HUM 225/II also has been infrequently available on the U.S. market and was not cataloged by distributors until it was reintroduced in 1978. Both sizes of Just Resting table lamps were “temporarily withdrawn” (TW) from production on 31 December 1989. This is in current production.

HUM 227 – She Loves Me, She Loves Me Not
     Height – 7½ inches
     A 7½ inch lamp base utilizing HUM 174 as part of the design. This lamp and its companion piece, HUM 228 Good Friends, have been made only in this 7½ inch size. It has been reported in an example of 8½ inch high which could have been an error. No lamps have been reported in that size to date and this is the only mention of this size. If found in the taller piece, it would be valued at about 25 percent higher than the price list value with a comparable trademark. This adaptation of the figurine, HUM 174 has a flower on the left fence post and eyes looking up or straight as the viewer as in some of the older figurines. This is in current production beginning with TMK-2.

HUM 228 – Good Friends
     Height – 7½ inches
      Modeled by Master Sculptor Arthur Möeller in 1953, like its companion piece, HUM 227, this lamp has been made only in the 7½ inch size since its introduction in the 1950s. This lamp also was listed as being 8½ inches high in the same 1959 catalog and would be valued at about a 25 percent increase if found that size. Neither the HUM 227 nor HUM 228 is known to date with the earlier Crown mark, TMK-1. Refer to the figurine of the same name, HUM 182, for more information. On the older lamps, the figure is much larger and the tree trunk post has a smoother finish. The Good Friends table lamp was “temporarily withdrawn” (TW) from production on 31 December 1989. Good Friends was matched with She Loves Me as one of a pair of Bookends, HUM 251 A. This is in current production beginning with TMK-2.

HUM 229 – Apple Tree Girl
     Height – 7½ inches
      This was a 7½ inch lamp base utilizing HUM 141 as part of the design. This well-known figurine is a natural for a lamp because the girl is already sitting in the branches of a tree. This lamp was first modeled by master sculptor Arthur Möeller in 1953 and has been restyled several times. Introduced about 1955 in the 7½ inch high size, it was listed in a 1959 catalog as being 8½ inch high, but an 8½ inch lamp has yet to be found. On the older lamps, the figure is much larger but the post still measures only 7½ inches high and 4¼ inches across. This same model is also used in one of the pair of Bookends, HUM 252 A. There is no record of this having been made in the larger 9½ inch size as some other lamps have been. This is in current production beginning with TMK-2 however, it was “temporarily withdrawn” (TW) from production on 31 December 1989. The old name of the Apple Tree Girl is “Spring” or “Springtime.”

HUM 230 – Apple Tree Boy
     Height – 7½ inches
      This was a 7½ inch lamp base utilizing HUM 142 as part of the design. This lamp was first modeled by master sculptor Arthur Möeller in 1953 and has been restyled several times. On the older lamps, the figure is much larger but the post still measures only 7The same information applies to this lamp as described for HUM 229 above. This model was also used as part of the Bookends, HUM 252 B, and the 1977 Annual Plate HUM 270, the year after the girl was used on a similar plate, HUM 269. Both lamps, HUM 229 and HUM 230, were copyrighted in the U.S. in 1955 and both pieces are known in TMK-2 through TMK-6. This is in current production beginning with TMK-2 however, it was “temporarily withdrawn” (TW) from production on 31 December 1989. The old name of the Apple Tree Boy is “Autumn” or “Fall.”

HUM 231 – Birthday Serenade
     Height – 9¾ inches
     The lamp places the same musicians who comprise the Birthday Serenade figurine HUM 218 at the base of a tree trunk that forms the lamp standard. While the figurine has been in continuous production since 1954, the lamp was known only in the TMK-2 trademark. In 1978, HUM 231 was reintroduced with a TMK-5 however, one collector owns an example with a TMK-4 trademark. The original U.S. copyright date fo r this lamp was Juy 31, 1953, GP6995. Interestingly, the TMK-2 lamps are incised with a 1954 copyright date. This particular lamp was out of production for many years. On April 27, 1966, GF341 was registered in the U.S. Copyright Office for the redesigned version of HUM 231. HUM 234 (below) a lamp similar to HUM 231 differs slightly in size and design. HUM 234 is 7 1/2 inches high and lacks the pink flower hanging above the boy’s head. HUM 231 also has a brass ferrule fr attaching the lamp socket. The lamp is considered rare until the reissue appeared in 1978. The price differential between old and new models may change depending on how many reissues are produced. It utilizes the HUM 218, Birthday Serenade as its design. The old model is found in the Full Bee TMK-2 trademark and reflects the same old mold, the girl with accordion/boy with flute design. These old mold design lamps measure about 9¾ inches tall and are fairly scarce. Value ranges from $1,000 to $1,500. The HUM 231 was reissued in the late 1970’s with the instruments reversed. Now the girl plays the flute and the boy plays the accordion. The newer pieces are found with the Last Bee (TMK-5) and the Missing Bee (TMK-6) trademarks at about $300 to $350. These two pieces are still in current production and are readily available. See also HUM 234.

HUM 232 – Happy Days
     Height – 9¾ inches
     The 9¾ inch Happy Days table lamp was placed in production in the 1950’s, but then inexplicably removed from the line after a short period of time. It was reissued in the late 1970’s in a remodeled design. The early pieces bear the Full Bee TMK-2 trademark, incised with a 1954 copyright date which is apparently close to the date of issue since no examples have been reported with an earlier Crown TMK-1 trademark. These are valued at between $1,000 and $1,500. At present, any examples of this lamp with a TMK-3 or TMK-4 would also be considered unusual. In researching available U.S. catalogs from 1954 on, no listing for this lamp was found until it was reissued in 1978 in Germany and later in other countries. The newer model pieces are found in the Last Bee (TMK-5) and the Missing Bee (TMK-6) trademarks appraised at about $300 to $350. This figurine is in current production. See also HUM 235 below. The German name for this lamp is Hausmusik, Kinderpaar, which translates as “House Music by Pair of Children.”

HUM 234 – Birthday Serenade
     Height – 7¾ inches
     This lamp is considered to be rare. The major difference of these from HUM 231 Birthday Serenade, is the reversal of the musical instruments between the new and the old models. HUM 234 is the incised number of the 7¾ inch size, while HUM 231 is the incised number on the 9¾ inch model. This lamp, like the larger HUM 231, was also removed from production for a time. Unlike the HUM 231, this lamp can be found in all trademarks beginning with the Full Bee (TMK-2). It was redesigned in the late 1970’s with the instruments reversed just as the taller HUM 231 was. It can be found in the old or the new styles in the Full Bee TMK-2 trademark. The lamp base shown on the right is the most difficult to locate.

HUM 235 – Happy Days
     Height – 7¾ inches
     This is the smaller size being 7¾ inches of the Happy Days HUM 232 lamp. It too was placed in production in the 1950’s and removed shortly thereafter. The date of issue was around 1954, the date of the incised copyright year on the bottom of teh older model lamps. No reports have been reported with the Crown TMK-1 trademark. Examples of the TMK-3 and TMK-4 would be unusual items, as catalog research indicated that this lamp was apparently out of production or not distributed in the U.S. until it was reissued in 1978. It was reissued in a new design in the late 1970’s as was the larger lamp. Unlike the larger lamp, however, this one can be found in all trademarks starting with the Full Bee TMK-2 trademark. See also HUM 232 above. The German name for this lamp is Hausmusik, Kinderpaar, which translates as “House Music by Pair of Children.”

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References

Hotchkiss, J. F., & Cassidy, C. (1981). Hummel art II. Des Moines, Iowa: Wallace-Homestead.

Hotchkiss, J. F., & Cassidy, C. (1981). Hummel art II. Retrieved on 26 April 2019 from https://archive.org/details/hummelartii00hotc/page/2.

Luckey, C. F. (1997). Luckey’s Hummel figurines & plates: Identification and value guide. Iola, WI: Krause Publications.

Miller, R. L. (2003). The no. 1 price guide to M.I. Hummel: Figurines, plates, more. Cumberland, MD: Portfolio Press.

Miller, R. L., & Genth, D. A. (1998). The no. 1 price guide to M.I. Hummel: Figurines, plates, more. Huntington, N.Y: Portfolio Press.

Miller, R. L., Ehrmann, E. W., & Pfeiffer, W. (1989). M.I. Hummel: The golden anniversary album. New York, N.Y.: Portfolio Press.